Niraj Bhatt – Architect's Blog

Ruminations on .NET, Architecture & Design

NuGet Package Restore, Content Folder and Version Control

I was recently explaining this nuance to a Dev on my team, and he suggested I should capture this in a blog post. So here we go. First some NuGet background.

NuGet is the de facto standard of managing dependencies in the .NET world. Imagine you have some reusable code – rather than sharing that functionality with your team via a DLL, you can create a NuGet Package for your team. What’s the benefit you may ask?

1) Firstly NuGet can do lot more than adding a DLL into your project references. Your NuGet package can add configuration entries as part of the installation, execute scripts or create new folders / files within Visual Studio project structure, which would greatly simplify the adoption of your reusable code.

2) Secondly as a package owner you can include dependencies to other packages or DLLs. So when a team member installs your package, she will get all the required dependencies at one go.

3) Finally the NuGet Package is local to your project, the assemblies are not installed on your system GAC. This not only helps for a clean development, but also at build time. Packages don’t have to be checked into the version control, rather at build time you can restore them on your build server – no more shared lib folders.

It’s quite a simple process to create NuGet Packages. Download the NuGet command line utility, organize artifacts (DLLs, scripts, source code templates, etc.) you want to include into their respective folders, create package metadata (nuget spec), and pack them (nuget pack) to get your nupkg file. You can now install / restore the package through Visual Studio or through command line (nuget install / restore).

Typically NuGet recommends 4 folders to organize your artifacts – ‘Lib’ contains your binaries, ‘Content’ contains the folder structure, files, which will be added to your project root, ‘tools’ contains scripts e.g. init. ps1, install.ps1, and ‘build’ contains custom build targets / props.

Now let’s get to the crux of this post – the restore aspect and what you should check into your version control. When you add NuGet Package to your project, NuGet does two things – it’s creates a packages.config and a packages folder. Config files keep a list of all the added packages, and packages folder contains the actual package (it’s basically an unzip of your nupkg file). Recommended approach is to check-in your packages.config file but not the packages folder. As part of NuGet restore, NuGet brings back all the packages in the packages folder (see workflow image below).

workflow-image

The subtle catch is NuGet restore doesn’t restore content files, or perform transformations that are part of it. These changes are applied the first time you install NuGet package, and they should be checked in the version control. This also goes to say don’t put any DLLs inside the content folder (they should anyways go to lib folder). If you must, you will have to check-in even those DLLs inside your version control.

nugetpackage

In summary, NuGet restore just restores the package files, it doesn’t perform any tokenization, transformation or execution as part of it. These activities are performed at the package installation, and corresponding changes must be checked into the version control.

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