Niraj Bhatt – Architect's Blog

Ruminations on .NET, Architecture & Design

Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Azure ExpressRoute Primer

What is Azure ExpressRoute?
ExpressRoute is an Microsoft Azure service that lets you create private connections between Microsoft datacenters and infrastructure that’s on your premises or in a colocation facility. ExpressRoute connections do not go over the public Internet, and offer higher security, reliability and speeds with lower latencies than typical connections over the Internet.

How to setup ExpressRoute Circuit?
ExpressRoute circuits are resources within Azure subscriptions. But before you setup Expressroute connection (or circuit as it’s normally referred as), you need to make decisions about setup parameters.
1) Connectivity Option – You can establish connection with Azure cloud either by extending your MPLS VPN (WAN), or you can leverage your Colocation provider and it’s cloud exchange or roll out an point-to-point ethernet your self. Most large enterprises would use the first option, medium size enterprise running in COLO would go with second option, and the last is more specialized scenario warranting higher level security
2) Port Speed – Bandwidth for your circuit
3) Service tier / SKU – standard or premium (more on this later)
4) Location – You might get multiple options for this depending on your choice for connectivity (#1). E.g. MPLS providers have multiple peering locations from which you can pick the one closet to you
5) Data Plan – Limited plan with pay as you go egress charges or unlimited plan with higher cost irrespective of egress volume

After you make these five choices, you can fire up PowerShell on your VM to execute ‘New-AzureDedicatedCircuit’. Remember to select the right Azure subscription (Add-AzureAccount / Select-AzureSubscription) where you want the circuit to be created. Please note you would need to import ExpressRoute module if not already (Import-Module ‘C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Azure\PowerShell\ServiceManagement\Azure\ExpressRoute\ExpressRoute.psd1’

New-AzureDedicatedCircuit -CircuitName $CircuitName -ServiceProviderName $ServiceProvider -Bandwidth $Bandwidth -Location $Location -sku Standard

As soon as this completes you will get a service key which is kind of a unique identifier for your circuit. At this step only your billing starts, as we have only completed Azure side of things. Now you need to work with your Network Service Provider, provide your service key and ask them to complete their side of configuration to Azure. This would also involve setting up a BGP session at your end. Once this done you are all set to leverage expressroute and connect the circuit to azure virtual networks – with the traffic flowing over private connection.

Connecting ExpressRoute Circuit to Azure Virtual Network
Once the circuit is configured it’s relatively straight forward to connect it to virtual network. Once again PowerShell is your friend. But before firing the below command ensure your VNET and the virtual gateway is created.

New-AzureDedicatedCircuitLink -ServiceKey “***” -VNetName “MyVNet”

ServiceKey parameter uniquely identifies your circuit. As circuits are part of the Azure Subscription (wish there was a way to view them in portal) your VNET should be part of the same subscription. This lead to the question – Can we connect expressroute circuits to VNETs across subscriptions? Answer is yes.

Connecting ExpressRoute Circuit to Azure Virtual Network across subscriptions
As we know circuit is part of a subscription, so as a subscription admin you will have to grant rights to other subscription admins so that they can link their VNETs to your circuit. Here’s the PowerShell cmdlet to do that.

New-AzureDedicatedCircuitLinkAuthorization -ServiceKey “***” -Description “AnotherProdSub” -Limit 2 -MicrosoftIds ‘devtest@contoso.com’

This commands allows 2 VNETs from AnotherProdSub to connect to the ExpressRoute circuit. You might see the last parameter MicrosoftId replaced by AzureAD Id (not sure what IDs are supported right now)

Once you have the authorization, you can query the servicekey from your subscription and link your VNET as appropriate.

Get-AzureAuthorizedDedicatedCircuit #This will get details of the circuit including ServiceKey

New-AzureDedicatedCircuitLink –servicekey “***” –VnetName ‘APSVNET’ #Link VNET in another subscription

Remember you can only connect 10 VNETs per circuit. Though this is a soft limit but you can grow only few folds. If you need to create 100 VNET instance you need to look at ExpressRoute Premium.

What is ExpressRoute Premium?
Premium tier for enterprises that need more VNETs per circuit, need their circuit to span geo-political region or have more than 4000 route prefixes. You will pay around 3000 USD more for the premium features, when compared to standard edition with same bandwidth.

How much it costs?
Express route costs boil down to price you pay to Microsoft and your service provider.
To Microsoft it’s
monthly fee depending on the port speed
Bandwidth consumed (unless you are in unlimited data where you flat 300 USD)
Virtual Gateway which you would provision in your VNET (mandatory for expressroute & S2S VPN)

To Network Service Provider:
It’s one time setup fee for the circuit
Bandwidth charges (how much data goes through their cloud to Microsoft)

How long does it take to setup connection?
Well it depends. If you already have a network service provider or an exchange provider supporting Azure, it shouldn’t take more than a day (excluding paperwork). Otherwise this can turn out to be a project in itself.

Can we use ExpressRoute to connect to office 365?
Answer is yes, but it actually depends on your provider. Apart from connecting to Azure VNET, expressroute allows you to establish public peering and Microsoft peering to route your Azure PaaS (public services) and Office 365 traffic over the private network. For more details refer to this link. Public peering allows you to route your traffic to public services like Azure Services and Azure SQL database over private tunnel.

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Managing Access to Cloud Resources

As you start your cloud incubation journey, one of the very first hurdles you would run into is access management. How to secure access to your cloud provider? Whom do you allow to provision resources? Do you want to centralize the provisioning, or empower project teams with self-service capability? Can we leverage on-premise identity stores for cloud access? Needless to say, these aspects can get quite tricky. In this post, I will talk about different options around managing accessibility to cloud services and as always would love to hear your feedback.

No Self Service: Many organizations looking at cloud as an extension to their data center, and want similar to enforce similar control over their cloud environment. Their IT team provisions and de-provisions cloud resources as necessary. But the end users have no direct access from their end. They still raise a ticket through tools like Service Now which are then full filled by IT Ops through automation or manual setup.

Self Service via Custom Portal: This is standard practice across many organizations. Instead of providing direct access via cloud service provider portal, they create a layer of abstraction – a custom portal for managing access. This is definitely feasible as most of the cloud service providers have APIs, controlling access to cloud resources. A typical custom portal can help drive governance. An example use case could be – someone requests a VM image and an request approval email is automatically sent to her manager. Further custom portals can provide a unified view catering to different cloud platforms – i.e. a single UI to provision workload on AWS, Azure or Google Cloud. But challenge with such initiative is to keep pace with new cloud services. Most of the cloud platforms are introducing new features biweekly, making custom portal a never ending project. One solution here could be to control the feature scope of the custom portal – e.g. cater to just IaaS services – Compute, Network, Storage & Security.

Controlled Access to Provider portal with extensions: Many enterprises don’t want to reinvent the wheel. Their intent is to add only delta functionality to the existing self-service cloud provider portal. For instance, most of the cloud provider portal have no context of the consuming enterprise, its projects, its policies, etc. In such cases, it makes sense to augment cloud provider portal with additional project view and build an ecosystem to enforce organizational policies. E.g. When User A logs into the extended Portal she can view the list of projects (a project can have a direct mapping to cloud subscription or account), her role / rights on each. But provisioning any cloud resources would have to be carried out through provider portal (may be a SSO with provider portal). Depending on the rights user has, she will be able to provision only those cloud resources.

Let’s understand the last option from Microsoft Azure perspective, though similar features are available in other cloud platforms like AWS as well.

Single Sign On:
To setup Single sign on you will require Azure Active Directory domain configuration and ADFS setup. You can find more details here. This ensures that only employees of the organization will have access to Azure portal & resources.

Controlling access to resources:
SSO is great, but you don’t want every user of the organization to have unrestricted access to Azure resources. Rather only the authorized set of users should have access to them. That’s where Role based access control comes in. A role in RBAC terms is a collection of actions that can be performed on an Azure resources or group of Azure resources (group of resources referred to as ‘Resource Groups’ in Azure are containers holding resources for a given application). RBAC is currently supported in Azure Preview Portal only. You can also configure the access through PowerShell.

Azure RBAC

Subscription, Administrators & Azure AD:
While RBAC is the preferred way of setting access control, knowing the different Azure Portals administrative roles is necessary to gain comprehensive understanding. Once you sign up for Azure EA, MS sets up an account for you called ‘Enterprise administrator’. As an enterprise admin you can create different accounts and subscriptions. Each account has an Account administrators who in turn can create multiple subscriptions, with each subscription having its own service administrator. Service Administrator is the super user having complete access to the subscription and can provision resources (VMs, Databases, etc.) as required. Service Administrator can also create co-administrators as required to support them with administrative tasks.
Coming to Azure AD, you can create, rename, delete Azure AD from Azure Portal. Every Azure Subscription can trust only one Azure AD and only service administrator has the rights to choose the trusted AD for a given subscription (Settings -> Subscriptions -> Edit Directory).

Azure Subscription & Azure AD

Hope that provided some good perspective. As always do drop a note below, on how are you managing access to cloud resources.

Overview of Office 365

Office 365 is suite of Microsoft products delivered software as a service from cloud. For consumers it represents a simplified pay as you go model, helping them use office products across multiple devices while for the enterprises the value proposition is workplace transformation by driving Enterprise Mobility.

Consumers can now pay a monthly subscription fee and have the word, excel and other office tools installed across 5 PCs and Macs. Users also get 5 more mobile office installs for Android and iOS platforms and there is a feature available called Office on demand which allows users to temporarily stream office 2013 applications on a windows 7 / 8 PC. In addition, one gets 20 GB of SkyDrive integrated with Office Web Apps (a subset of desktop version) and 60 Skype world minutes to make calls in over 60 countries.

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Enterprises, on the other hand, are being disrupted by various needs of geographically distributed teams, decentralized work locations, BYOD and data security, social engagement platforms, etc. Office 365 for enterprise, adds additional hosted services like Exchange, Lync, SharePoint, Yammer, SkyDrive Pro, etc. to cater to these needs. These services can be accessed using Single Sign On with an on premise AD / ADFS. What’s more, with SaaS model you take the entire IT complexity and management out of the equation.

Office 365 also has something for developers. The developer subscription which is bundled free with MSDN subscription or otherwise costs 99 USD, allows developers to build applications for Office 365 including SharePoint Online. These applications typically enhance office tools – for instance an enterprise can develop set of applications for their employees and avail them under my organization section of the portal. Developers can do application development using familiar development tools. For small enterprises, which want an easy way to augment the OOB office functionality, office team offers “NAPA” – office 365 development tools right of your browser. In addition to this, enterprise developers can also use Visual Studio. ISVs planning to develop commercial applications, can publish their applications to the office store.

Azure Benefits for MSDN subscribers

Friends, hope you are aware of this great offer. Click on the image below to sign up 🙂

MSDNAzureOffer2

Windows Azure vs. Force.com vs. Cloud Foundry

Below is a brief write up of some personal views. Let me know your thoughts.

Windows Azure is the premier cloud offering from Microsoft. It has a comprehensive set of platform services ranging from IaaS to Paas to SaaS. This is a great value proposition for many enterprises looking to migrate to cloud in a phased manner; first move as-is with IaaS and then evolve to PaaS. In addition, Azure has deep integration across Microsoft products –including SharePoint, SQL Server, Dynamics CRM, TFS, etc. This translates to aligned cloud roadmap, committed product support and license portability. Though .NET is the primary development environment for Azure platform, most of the Azure services are exposed as REST APIs. There are JAVA, Ruby and other SDKs available which allows variety of developers to easily leverage Azure platform. Azure also allows customers to spawn Linux VMs, though that’s limited to IaaS offerings.

Force.com allows enterprises to extend Salesforce.com – the CRM from SalesForce. Instead of just providing SDKs and APIs, Salesforce has created force.com as a PaaS platform – so that you focus only on building extensions; rest is managed by Salesforce. Salesforce also provides a marketplace ‘AppExchange’ where companies can sell these extensions to potential customers. Though force.com offers an accelerated development platform (abstracting many programming aspects), programmers still need to learn APEX programming language and related constructs. Some enterprises are considering force.com as their de-facto programming platform – taking it beyond the world of CRM. It’s important to understand the applicability of force.com for such scenarios would typically be limited to transactional business applications. So, where should enterprises go when they need to develop custom applications with different programming stacks and custom frameworks? Salesforce answer is Heroku. Heroku supports all the major programming platforms including Ruby, Node.js, JAVA, etc. with exception of .NET. Heroku uses Debian and Ubuntu as the base operating system.

Many enterprises today are contemplating their move to PaaS cloud citing vendor lock-in. For instance, if they move to Azure PaaS platform their applications would run only on Azure, and they would have to remediate them to port to AWS. It would definitely be great to have a PaaS platform agnostic of a vendor. This is the idea behind open source PaaS platform Cloud Foundry. It’s an effort co-funded by VMware and EMC. VMware offers a Cloud Foundry hosted solution, with the underlying infrastructure being vCloud. Cloud Foundry supports various programming languages like Java, Ruby, Node.js, etc. and frameworks like MySQL, MongoDB, RabbitMQ among others. VMware also offers vFabric, a PaaS platform focused on JAVA spring framework. vFabric is an integrated product with VMWare infrastructure, providing a suite of offerings around Runtime, Data Management and Operations. I feel future of vFabric is likely to depend on the industry adoption of Cloud Foundry (there is also another open source PaaS effort being carried out by Red Hat called OpenShift).

Overview of VMware Cloud Platform

Continuing my discussion on major Cloud Platforms, in this post I will talk about VMware (subsidiary of EMC) – one of the companies that pioneered the era of virtualization. Flagship product of VMware is ESX (VSphere being product, which bundles ESX with vCenter) a hypervisor that runs directly on the hardware (bare metal). As you would expect, VMware is major player in private cloud and data center space. It also has a public IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) cloud offering and also supports an open source PaaS platform (understandably no SaaS offerings). Below is a quick overview of VMware offerings.

Private CloudvCloud Suite is an end-to-end solution from VMware for creating and managing your own private cloud. The solution has two major components – Cloud Infrastructure and Cloud Management. Cloud Infrastructure components include VMware products like vSphere (cloud OS controlling the underlying infrastructure) and vCloud Director (multitenant self-service portal for provisioning VM instances based on vApp Templates), while Cloud Management consists of operational products like vCenter (centralized extensible platform for managing infrastructure) among others. There are also vCloud SDKs available which you can use to customize the platform to specific business requirements. Also, with last year acquisition of DynamicOps (now called vCloud Automation Center) VMware is extending its product support to other hypervisors in the market. Other vendors too like Microsoft are evolving with similar offerings with Hyper-V, System Center, SPF and Windows Azure Services. It’s important to note though, quite a few enterprises operate a private cloud like setup using VSphere alone and build custom periphery around it as necessary.

Public Cloud – In case you don’t have budget to setup your own datacenter or are looking to build a hybrid approach which helps you do a cloud burst for specific use cases, you can leverage VMware’s vCloud Hybrid Service (AKA vCHS). The benefit here is migration and operation remains seamless, as you would use the same tools (and seamlessly extend your processes) that were being used for in-house Private Clouds.

PaaS Cloud – VMware has a PaaS offering for private clouds called vFabric. vFabric application platform contains various products focused on JAVA Spring Framework stack. Architects can create a deployment topology using drag and drop for their multi-tier applications. Not only they can automate the provisioning, but also scale their applications in accordance with business demand. In addition, VMware is also funding an open source PaaS platform called Cloud Foundry (CF). The value proposition here is you can move this platform to any IaaS vendor (vCloud, OpenStack, etc.), so when you switch between cloud vendors you don’t have to modify your applications. This is contrary to other PaaS offerings which are tied to the underlying infrastructure – e.g. application ready for Azure PaaS would have to undergo remediation to be hosted on Google PaaS. Also, being open source you can customize the CF platform to suite your needs (there is similar effort being carried out by Red Hat called OpenShift).

Finally, you might hear the term vBlock (or vBlock Systems) in context of VMware. VCE (Virtual Computing Environment) – the company which manufactures vBlock Systems was formed by collaboration of Cisco, EMC and VMWare. These vBlock systems racks contain Cisco’s servers & switches, EMC’s storage and VMware virtualization. There are quite a few service providers using vBlock, to create their own set of cloud offerings and services.

Hope this helps!

Overview of Google Cloud Platform

In next few posts, I will try to give a brief overview of major Cloud Computing platforms. As I started writing this post, it reminded me of an incident. Few years back I was chatting with a Microsoft Architect. He proudly told me that if Google were to shut tomorrow, none of the enterprises would care about it. Well, since then things have changed. From a provider of search engine, email and mobile platform (Android), Google has made it ways into enterprises. To add another experience, recently I was visiting a fortune customer and saw one of the account managers using Gmail. While my first reaction was he shouldn’t be checking his personal emails at work (we were discussing something important), he, in fact, was replying to an official email. I learned from him that they were among the early adopters of Google Apps. With those interesting anecdotes, below is quick overview of Google cloud platform.

Google Apps – You can think of Google Apps as a SaaS offering more on the lines of Microsoft Office 365. It includes Gmail, Google Calendar, Docs, Sites, Videos, etc. Value proposition is – you can customize these services under a domain name (i.e. white label). Google charges per user monthly fee for these services (this fee is applicable to Google Apps for Business; Google also offers a free version for educational institutions under brand Google Apps for Education). In addition, Google has created a market place (Google Apps Marketplace), where organizations can buy third party software (partner ecosystem) which further extends Google Apps. As you would expect, Google also provides infrastructure and APIs for third party software developers.

Google Compute Engine – GCE is the IaaS offering of Google. Interestingly, it offers sub hour billing calculated at minute level with minimum of 10 minutes. For now only Linux images / VMs are supported. Here’s a Hello World to get started with GCE. Note that you need to setup your billing profile to get started with GCE.

Google App Engine – GAE is an ideal platform to create applications for Google Apps Marketplace. A PaaS offering from Google – easy to scale as your traffic and data grows. Like Microsoft’s Windows Azure Web Sites, you can serve your app from a custom domain or use a free name on appspot.com domain. You can write your applications using JAVA, Python, PHP or Go. You can download respective SDKs from here along with a plugin for Eclipse (SDKs come with an emulator to simplify development experience). With App Engine you are allowed to register up to 10 applications per account – and all applications can use up to 1 GB of storage and enough CPU and bandwidth to support an application serving around 5 million page views a month at no cost. Developers can also use NoSQL (App Engine Datastore) and relational (Google Cloud SQL) stores for storing their applications data. Google Cloud Storage a similar offering to Windows Azure Blob Storage, allows you to store files and objects up to terabytes in size. App Engine also provides additional services such as URL Fetch, Mail, Memcache, Image Manipulation, etc. to help perform common application tasks.

Google BigQuery – BigQuery is an analytic tool for querying massive datasets. All you need to do is move your dataset to Google’s infrastructure. After that, you can query data using SQL-like queries. These queries can be executed using a browser or command line or even from your application by making calls to BigQuery REST API (client libraries are available for Java, PHP and Python).

So, in a nutshell these are the major offerings of Google Cloud platform encompassing SaaS, PaaS and IaaS. Google Apps appears to be the most widely used of all offerings, with Google claiming more than 5 million businesses running on it.

Hope you found this overview useful.